Moore - example of foliated vine group

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Title: Moore - example of foliated vine group
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There was interest among scholars and collectors in a recently discovered, never before published 17th-century joined chest, originally owned by John and Hannah Drake and passed down through successive generations of the family. Keno found the chest in a house near his own family's homestead in upstate New York. Its flat carved surface, oak lid, and paneled sides and back make it one of the most elaborate Connecticut River valley three-panel chests known. Estimated at $100,000/150,000, it sold for $632,400 to a collector on the phone, underbid in the salesroom by Massachusetts dealer David Wheatcroft, sitting with clients. According to the catalog, the chest was probably made by Deacon John Moore, Hannah Moore Drake's brother, a pioneer settler of Windsor, Connecticut, who established a multigenerational woodworking tradition. Deacon Moore emigrated from England with his father in 1630 along with three Puritan ministers who moved their community from Dorchester, Massachusetts, to Windsor on the banks of the Connecticut River north of Hartford. Deacon Moore built the first meetinghouse and school in Windsor. His chest is part of the "foliated vine group," so named for the pattern of its carving. Approximately 30 boxes, two joined chests, and a table are known from this group. Joshua Lane and Donald P. White III wrote about this furniture in American Furniture, 2005, "Fashioning Furniture and Framing Community: Woodworkers and the Rise of a Connecticut River Town." Drake family carved and painted joined chest with drawer, attributed to the Deacon John Moore shop tradition, the "foliated vine group," Windsor, Connecticut, 1675-90. Estimated at $100,000/150,000, it sold for $632,400, a record for a 17th-century chest, to a collector on the phone, underbid by Massachusetts dealer David Wheatcroft in the salesroom. With its extensively carved surface, oak lid, sides double-paneled over a single panel, back finished with three panels, and finished moldings on all four sides, it is the most elaborate and fully developed American Colonial three-panel chest known. A rare survivor, it is in remarkably good condition, retaining its original surface and much of its original painted decoration. According to the catalog, it was possibly originally owned by John (1622-1688) and Hannah (Moore) Drake (1633-1686) of Windsor (later Simsbury), Connecticut, or it could have been a wedding gift for their son, Enoch Drake (1655-1698), who married Sarah Porter (1655-1730) on November 11, 1680. This chest descended to Enoch and Sarah Drake's son, Enoch (1683-1776), and his wife, Elizabeth (1685-1717), and next to their daughter, Elizabeth (1707-1802), who married John Gillett (1707-1808). It continued through successive generations of the Gillett, Ward, and Riddle branches of their family directly to the current owners. Although John Drake was himself a woodworker from the Drake family tradition in Windsor, this chest is believed to be the work of Hannah (Moore) Drake's brother, Deacon John Moore (1614-1677), a pioneer settler of Windsor who established a multigenerational family woodworking tradition. In 1630, he emigrated from England with his father Thomas Moore (1584-1645), along with three Puritan ministers and other congregants, to establish a religious community in Dorchester, Massachusetts. In 1635, they relocated their community to land north of Hartford on the banks of the Connecticut River, which they named Windsor, after Windsor, Berkshire, England. Deacon Moore was active in Windsor, serving as deacon of the First Congregational Church as well as selectman from 1653 to 1674; he built the schoolhouse and the meetinghouse, for which he was paid in land grants. He secured land on the west side of Windsor (now Simsbury) for his sister Hannah and brother-in-law John Drake. This chest is part of Deacon Moore's "foliated vine group," so named for the distinctive ornamentation consisting of symmetrical patterns of floral motifs and vines. Approximately 30 boxes are known from this group as well as a table at the Connecticut Historical Society and two joined chests. One of the chests (in a private collection) displays a four-panel front. The other example from the Moore shop is in the collection of Old Sturbridge Village and was possibly made by Nathaniel Gaylord (1656-1720), who was trained in this craft tradition. The chest Keno offered and the Old Sturbridge Village example are very similar in their three-paneled form and foliate ornamentation. For additional information on Deacon John Moore and his work, see "Fashioning Furniture and Framing Community: Woodworkers and the Rise of a Connecticut River Valley Town" by Joshua W. Lane and Donald P. White III, American Furniture, 2005, edited by Luke Beckerdite, pp. 178-188. SOURCE: www.maineantiquedigest.com/stories/index.html?id=3110

Given names Surname Sosa Birth Place Death Age Place Last change
John Moore Deacon
1614
407 Rattlesden, Southwold, Suffolk, England
1 September 14, 1677
344 63 Windsor, Hartford, CT
Never
Given names Surname Age Given names Surname Age Marriage Place Last change
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