{12} Captain John Norton (III), born Virginia about 1670 and died in Currituck County, North Carolina 1745. See {12} below.

{12} Captain John Norton (III) married Margaret Rolfe (spelled Relfe in North Carolina), daughter of John Rolfe II and Mary (Warren) Rolfe, daughter of Captain David and Margaret Warren. David Warren dying intestate, resulted in administration requested by George Walker in right of Margaret Walker the relict. Administration appeal listed in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 9 April 1666 and recorded 7 June 1666.

(From 300 Years Along the Pasquotank, by Jesse F. Pugh, 1958) Captain John Norton, II. ‘A great many people in the Province of North Carolina must have taken part in some form of military activity during the years 1702-1718. Troops were raised to suppress the Tuscaroras following their surprise attack and massacre of 130 colonists in 1711. And scarcely had the colony time to return to normal living after the Indian War when it was called upon by South Carolina to come to the aid of that hard pressed colony against the Yemassee Indians. ‘Although this period must have been a time when many men were marching as to war, the items of information which have been preserved relating to individual participation are few and far between. John Norton is one of a small number concerning whom a few brief but authentic bits of information have survived. Since he and Colonel William Reed were closely allied during the time of Cary’s Rebellion, and since Reed is known to have aided with Governor William Glover against Cary, it seems plausible to assume that Norton, a professional soldier, was active with the Glover partisans. The first documented item about Norton’s military career, however, refers to his service in the Tuscarora War. ‘Following the devastating onslaught by the Tuscaroras, Governor Edward Hyde in desperation appealed to both Virginia and South Carolina for Assistance. Virginia agreed to help if pay and other considerations were guaranteed, but South Carolina immediately dispatched a few whites with about five hundred Indians under the command of Colonel James Barnwell. Joining with the North Carolina contingent the combined forces succeeded in defeating the Tuscaroras in three engagements and a truce was effected in the spring of 1712. The North Carolinans were disappointed because the Indians were not completely subdued and refused to reimburse the South Carolinians for their efforts. In an effort to obtain some sort of recompense, the soldiers from South Carolina seized some of the Tuscaroras after the truce and carried them home as slaves. ‘Incensed at this high-handed treatment, the Tuscaroras resumed their attacks during the fall of 1712. Meanwhile the condition of North Carolina had now worsened. An epidemic of yellow fever had claimed victims, including Governor Hyde. Able Thomas Pollock, acting governor by virtue of his position as president of the council, appealed to South Carolina for help once more. That colony responded with about 1000 troops, mostly Indians under Colonel James Moore (former Governor of South Carolina). ‘In a public letter written in December 1712 to ‘friends and neighbors’ in the colony, and sent out by two Currituckians, Lieutenant Woodhouse and Thomas Johnson, (Gov.) Pollock stated the following. ‘I am informed by Mr. Knight that Captain Norton sailed last Saturday from Pasquotank in Major Reed’s sloop with 30 or 40 men, provisions, and two Barrels of powder and ten barrels, I think, of shot.’ In all probability, therefore, Captain Norton joined Colonel Moore’s command and participated in the capture of the Tuscaroras’ stronghold, Fort Nohoroco, on Contentnea Creek, in March 1713, when the power of this warlike tribe was completely destroyed. ‘In 1715 the picture was reversed, for the existence of the Colony of South Carolina was threatened by the fierce uprising of the Yemassees, the same tribe which had helped to subdue the Tuscaroras. That province directed an urgent appeal to North Carolina for help. The members of the Council of State were mindful of the help received in their hour of distress, and responded. At a meeting held 25 May 1715 the Council ordered Captian Benjamin West, Captain John Palin, and Captain John Norton to call for volunteers among their companies, promising to every soldier responding to this inducement ‘immediately out of ye publick treasure five pounds for and towards providing them with necessaryies for their expedition.’ By this time it appears the inhabitants may have become war weary because the council’s order continued somewhat grimly: ‘in case of any obstinacy or Reluctance’ the Captains were ordered to ‘draw ten able men from each of their Companies provided they are not those who have ye most numerous familyes.’ Since North Carolina went to considerable expense to assist her neighbor to the south, it is assumed that Norton, Palin, West, and the men, accompanied the expedition. In 1710 Norton purchased 300 acres from William Sawyer and wife Mary, the part accruing to William Jennings, son of John Jennings, from his joint patent of 600 acres with Thomas Johnson in 1694. Three years later Norton and his wife May assigned 200 acres to Captain John Blish. The title must not have been transferred, however, since Norton’s son (Captain John Norton III) sold this same acreage in 1724. When the Northeast side of Pasquotank was formed into the Parish of St. Peter by legislative enactment in 1715, Captain John Norton was named one of the vestrymen. In 1716 this soldier was involved in a tragic accident. He fatally shot his brother-in-law, Thomas Johnson, when the two were stalking a deer. At the hearing called to investigate the death, Norton declared he had mistaken a movement in the bushes for a deer. This occurred on 29 December 1716. So far as known John Norton has the distinction o being the first ‘regular army man’ in the Camden area whose military record is supported by authentic documents.’ (Note: 300 Years Along the Pasquotank gives Captain John (II) Norton as born about 1680 and died about 1718. Captain John’s son is also mentioned. Since Captain John Norton (III) lived in Perquimans Precinct (adjacent to Pasquotank) in 1708, and moved to Pasquotank in 1710, it is practically certain that Captain John Norton (III) (also a soldier), accompanied his father on the two expeditions against the Tuscaroras, and to South Carolina in 1715. It will be noted that Colonel James Moore (former Governor of South Carolina), a contemporary of Captain John Norton (II) led the second expedition against the Tuscaroras according to the records, Colonel Moore and Captain John Norton (II) were about the same age. And, with two Captain John Nortons in the same vicinity at the same time it I not hard to see how heir ages could have been mixed-up. AWS) ‘There were three younger men in the neighborhood, John Norton (III), Griffith Jones, and Rory Scarborough, who seemingly stood not in awe one or anything, for they had the temerity to testify adversely against the powerful Colonel Reed when he was accused of making scurrilous remarks concerning the recently arrived Governor, George Burrington. Reed was not one to overlook an affront; whether real or imagined, and what he thought was an opportunity for retaliation soon presented itself. Jeremiah Finch, a young gentleman of fortune, had recently come from New England and had taken up patent when he was stricken with some fatal malady. Rory Scarborough, who had been appointed administrator of Finch’s estate, proceeded to sell at public auction his belongings, among which were thirty-three muslim handkerchiefs. Scarborough purchased some of these handkerchiefs from the highest bidder and filed a complete report of the entire transaction with court official. Colonel Reed, jumping to a conclusion, accused Scarborough of appropriating fourteen handkerchiefs at a price lower than reported. The charge was baseless, and dropped.’

Captain John Norton of Albemarle County, North Carolina, in court at Pasquotank, Albemarle County on 29 September 1716 was chided for shooting a gun valued at 10 shillings. (This was when he shot his brother-in-law, Thomas Johnson, thinking movement in the bushes was the deer they were stalking.)

Colonial Records, North Carolina, Bolume 11, page 180. ‘Council meeting at Chowen, North Carolina, 25 May 1715. The Honorable Charles Eden, Esquire, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, ordered Captain Benjamin West, Captain John Palin, and Captain John Norton, commanders in the Honorable Charles Edens own Regiment, to draw their Companies and declare to them that so many as shall voluntarily go to South Carolina under the command of Colonel Theophilus Hastings to aide and assist that Government against their Indians now in Rebellion. Each person shall immediately receive five pounds and after landing in South Carolina shall receive two shillings from that government.

Pasquotank County, North Carolina Deed Book 1700/47 p. 70 (Archives) 26 October 1713. John Norton asigns to william Ross all right, title, and interest in within patent, except what William Sawyer has conveyed out of it. /s/ John Norton /s/ Mary Norton (300 acres)

Pasquotank County, North Carolina Deed Book 1700/47 -6 (Archives) 4 May 1700, William Jennings and wife Mary (Norton) Jennings ((daughter of Captain John Norton (II) and Mary (Sawyer) Norton, (daughter of William Sawyer, Sr. She had three brothers, Thomas, Robert, John, and William.)) deed to Robert Sawyer. 92 acres of land on NE side of Pasquotank River, being part of patent of 400 acres granted the said William Jennings, Jr. by patent dated 2/20/1696, and layed out by Captain Thomas Relfe, Deputy Surveyor. Appointed friends Mr. John Jennings, Captain Thomas Rolfe, Mr. William Relfe and Thomas Albrigton or any of them to appear for them at preceinct court. /s/ William Jennings /s/ Mary Jennings. Witnessed by John Jennings. Acknowledged in open court 15 April 1701, by Thomas Albrigton. (He was probably called William Jennings, Jr. because there was another William Jennings in the same section, a little older.)

Pasquotank County, North Carolina Deed Book 1700/47, p. 70. 20 October 1713. John Norton (II) and wife assign all right, title and interest to William Ross, except that William Sawyer has conveyed out of it. /s/ John and Mary Norton.

Pasquotank County, North Carolina Deed Book 1700/47, p. 150 (Archives) 14 July 1716. Deed of Gift from William Jennings for love and affection for daughter Mary Rodes and Daniel Rodes (son of Thomas and Mary Rodes), a tract of land called Hickory Neck, 80 acres. If Daniel die without issue, the land to go to Charity Rodes. Witnessed by Mary McDaniel.

Pasquotank County, North Carolina A/53 21 April 1710. Deed from William Sawyer and wife Mary for 200 acres to John Norton (II), lying and being on the NE side of Pasquotank River, being part of patent of land belonging to Williams Jennings of Chronoer Creek and Thomas Johnson 600 acres, patented 1 January 1694. Witnessed by Thomas Miller and John Relfe.

Captian John Norton III, born about 1670, Nansimond county, Virginia, died 1745 Currituck County, born about 1674, Pasquotank County, North Carolina. John married about 1688 in Pasquotank County, Margaret Relfe (or Rolfe), born about 1674 Pasquotank County, North Carolina, died before 1744, Currituck County, North Carolina. [1][2]

Note
Note: William Norton & Ann Boynton
[1]
Note: arms-norton-roger - Conyers Norton
[2]
Sources
  1. ↑ JENNINGS,Relfe/Rolfe,Norton Genealogy
  2. ↑ From James Norton Collins’ Peerage of England, Vol. IX, PP 253-259:

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